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Category Archive : British Royal Family

Meghan Markle, Duchess of Sussex – pre royal life achievements

At the age of 11, meghan lobbied a dishwasher soap manufacturer to change its sexist TV commercial

Graduated from Northwestern University in 2003 with a double major in theater and international studies.Worked At The U.S. Embassy In Buenos Aires, ArgentinaWorked as a freelance calligrapher as a side job“When I was auditioning, at the onset, instead of waiting tables, I did calligraphy,”

Launched a lifestyle blog, “The Tig”, a “hub for the discerning palate – those with a hunger for food, travel, fashion & beauty.”

Counsellor for international charity One Young World.Participating in the One Young World 2014 Summit in which she joined a panel for the ‘Bridging the Gap’ session.

Visited Afghanistan with the United Service Organisations (USO) which supports the military and their families.“In gratitude to our troops, and the opportunity to thank them personally for their sacrifice and service.”Such an honor and feeling very very blessed. USOtour”

Advocate for Political Participation and Leadership – UN women.listen to her 2015 speech.

Global ambassador for World Vision, the world’s largest international children’s charity.

Travelled to Rwanda in 2016 with World Vision to see first-hand the importance of clean water.

Travelled to India with World Vision in 2017, focusing on gender equality and particularly girls access to education.

Worked alongside the Myna Mahila Foundation focusing on stigma surrounding menstruation & how that can directly inhibits women from pursuing an education.Read Meghan’s article on the Myna Mahila Foundation for TIME.

Worked her way towards becoming a successful actress. Most noteably known for her role as Rachel Zane in USA networks hit show “Suits” from 2011-2017.

Brand ambassador for Canadian retailer, Reitmans. Creating/designing multiple collections .

Fluent in spanish and studied French for six years Participated in USA Network’s ‘I wont stand for’ campaign”I won’t stand for racism,” — Meghan between the ages of 13-17, volunteered at a soup kitchen in Skid Row, Los Angeles.Meghan continued to volunteer at the soup kitchen when she would return home to LA until the age of 22.

Attended the Novak Djokovic Foundation New York dinner in 2013The Novak Djokovic Foundation focuses on Early Childhood Education and Early Childhood Development.

Wrote an essay titled “I’m More Than An ‘Other,'” for Elle Magazine on her bi-racial ethnicity in 2015here: https://t.co/Ki7L4DJbAQVolunteered with the Glass Slipper Project during her university years. An organisation that collects donated dresses for teenagers who are unable to buy their own prom attire.

Attended the Dove Self-Esteem Project event in 2015 aimed at helping young people all around the world build positive body confidence and self-esteem.

In 2016 hosted the Watercolour Project Event at LUMAS gallery in Toronto – paintings were made by students in Rwanda and ended up raising enough money to build a well through the help of World Vision.

In 2015, Meghan hosted the Women in Cable Telecommunications Signature Luncheon at McCormick Place – Chicago, Illinois. This luncheon is a premier industry event where distinguished leaders come together in support of women in the cable industry.

In 2014, Meghan/The Tig partnered with BRIKA to develop a capsule collection with proceeds going to Feeding America & Second Harvest. Second Harvest was also an organisation which Meghan worked with to pick up & deliver leftover food from the “suits” set to local soup kitchens

In 2013, spoke on the movement to stop discrimination, focusing on the gender pay gap.

Credit/ https://twitter.com/ddarveyy?s=09

Buckingham Palace banned ‘coloured immigrants or foreigners’ from office roles.

Buckingham Palace banned ‘coloured immigrants or foreigners’ from office roles.

The Queen’s courtiers banned ethnic minorities from serving in clerical roles in the royal household
The Queen’s courtiers banned ethnic minorities from serving in clerical roles in the royal household

BUCKINGHAM Palace banned “coloured immigrants or foreigners” from office roles until at least the late 1960s, according to new documents.

The papers, which were recently discovered at the National Archives, show the Queen’s courtiers banned ethnic minorities from serving in clerical roles in the royal household.

The files also reveal how Buckingham Palace negotiated controversial clauses – that remain in place to this day – exempting the Queen and her household from laws that prevent race and sex discrimination.

The move is set to reignite the debate over the British royal family and race. It is part of the Guardian’s ongoing investigation into the royal family’s use of an arcane parliamentary procedure, known as Queen’s consent, to secretly influence the content of British laws.

The documents reveal how in 1968, the Queen’s chief financial manager informed civil servants that “it was not, in fact, the practice to appoint coloured immigrants or foreigners” to clerical roles in the royal household, but they were permitted to work as domestic servants.

It is unclear when the practice ended and Buckingham Palace refused to answer questions about the ban and when it was revoked. It said its records showed people from ethnic minority backgrounds being employed in the 1990s. It added that before that decade, it did not keep records on the racial backgrounds of employees.

In the 1960s government ministers sought to introduce laws that would make it illegal to refuse to employ an individual on the grounds of their race or ethnicity.

But the Queen has been excluded from those equality laws for more than 40 years, which has made it impossible for people from ethnic minorities working for Buckingham Palace to complain to the courts if they believe they have been discriminated against.

In a statement, Buckingham Palace did not dispute that the Queen had been exempted from the laws, adding that it had a separate process for hearing complaints related to discrimination, but it did not detail what this process consists of.

The official documents reveal how government officials in the 1970s coordinated with the Queen’s advisers on the wording of the laws.

In March the Duchess of Sussex, the family’s first mixed-race member, said she had had suicidal thoughts during her time in the royal family, and alleged that a member of the family had expressed concern about her child’s skin colour.

Some of the documents uncovered by the Guardian relate to the use of Queen’s consent, an obscure parliamentary mechanism through which the monarch grants parliament permission to debate laws that affect her and her private interests.

In 1968, the then home secretary, James Callaghan, and civil servants at the Home Office appear to have believed that they should not request Queen’s consent for parliament to debate the race relations bill until her advisers were satisfied it could not be enforced against her in the courts.

At the time, Callaghan wanted to expand the UK’s racial discrimination laws, which only prohibited discrimination in public places, so that they also prevented racism in employment or services such as housing.

A key proposal of the bill was the Race Relations Board, which would act as an ombudsman for discrimination complaints and could bring court proceedings against individuals or companies that maintained racist practices.

In February 1968, a Home Office civil servant, TG Weiler, summarised the progress of discussions with Lord Tryon, the keeper of the privy purse, who was responsible for managing the Queen’s private finances, and other courtiers.

Tryon, he wrote, had informed them Buckingham Palace was prepared to comply with the proposed law, but only if it enjoyed similar exemptions to those provided to the diplomatic service, which could reject job applicants who had been resident in the UK for less than five years.

According to Weiler, Tryon considered staff in the Queen’s household to fall into one of three types of roles: “(a) senior posts, which were not filled by advertising or by any overt system of appointment and which would presumably be accepted as outside the scope of the bill; (b) clerical and other office posts, to which it was not, in fact, the practice to appoint coloured immigrants or foreigners; and (c) ordinary domestic posts for which coloured applicants were freely considered, but which would in any event be covered by the proposed general exemption for domestic employment.”

“They were particularly concerned,” Weiler wrote, “that if the proposed legislation applied to the Queen’s household it would for the first time make it legally possible to criticise the household. Many people do so already, but this has to be accepted and is on a different footing from a statutory provision.”

A Home Office official noted that the courtiers “agreed that the way was now open for the secretary of state to seek the Queen’s consent to place her interest at the disposal of parliament for the purpose of the bill”.

The exemption was extended to the present day when in 2010 the Equality Act replaced the 1976 Race Relations Act, the 1975 Sex Discrimination Act and the 1970 Equal Pay Act. For many years, critics have regularly pointed out that the royal household employed few black, Asian or minority-ethnic people.

In 1990 the journalist Andrew Morton reported in the Sunday Times that “a black face has never graced the executive echelons of royal service – the household and officials” and “even among clerical and domestic staff, there is only a handful of recruits from ethnic minorities”.

A Buckingham Palace spokesperson said: “The royal household and the sovereign comply with the provisions of the Equality Act, in principle and in practice. This is reflected in the diversity, inclusion and dignity at work policies, procedures and practices within the royal household.

“Any complaints that might be raised under the act follow a formal process that provides a means of hearing and remedying any complaint.”

People who cannot immediately be removed would be stripped of benefits – placing them in the No Recourse to Public Funds (NRPF) category – and have their family reunion rights limited.

In the Queen’s Speech last month, she said that under the New Plan for Immigration legislation, measures would be “brought forward to establish a fairer immigration system that strengthens the United Kingdom’s borders and deters criminals who facilitate dangerous and illegal journeys”.

The plans have been branded “cruel and unfair”, with campaigners arguing that they “slam the door in the face” of people who could be in urgent need of the UK’s protection.

Enver Solomon, chief executive of the Refugee Council, said the plans “undermined” the UK’s “vital commitment” to providing protection to those in need by “unjustly differentiating” between refugees based on how they arrive.

“This is a cruel and unfair approach that slams the door in the face of people who could be in urgent need of our protection,” he added.

Meghan Markle Discusses How the Pandemic Has Disproportionately Impacted Women of Color at Vax Live The Duchess of Sussex also talked about her unborn daughter in a video recorded for the event.

Meghan Markle Discusses How the Pandemic Has Disproportionately Impacted Women of Color at Vax Live
The Duchess of Sussex also talked about her unborn daughter in a video recorded for the event.

Meghan Markle wasn’t able to attend Global Citizen’s Vax Live: The Concert To Reunite The World in person, but she still made sure her voice was heard at the event.

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex co-chaired the event, which was organized to raise awareness about the COVID-19 vaccine and encourage people to get vaccinated. While Prince Harry attended the event in-person, Meghan, who is currently very pregnant with the couple’s second child, was not able to join him. Her presence was still very much felt at Vax Live, however, as she recorded a video message for the occasion.

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Meghan wore a gorgeous red shirt dress with a pink poppy flower pattern in the video, which was filmed outdoors in a lovely garden. The duchess wore her hair down in loose curls, pull simply to one side and could be seen protectively cradling her stomach in some moments during the clip.

In her speech, the Meghan discussed the intersection of gender and the pandemic, specifically, how women—and especially women of color—will be disproportionately affected by the pandemic and its related shutdowns, saying:

“The past year has been defined by communities coming together tirelessly and heroically to tackle COVID-19. And we’ve gathered tonight because the road ahead is getting brighter, but it’s going to take every one of us to find our way forward. As campaign chairs of VAX LIVE, my husband and I believe it’s critical that our recovery prioritizes the health, safety and success of everyone, and particularly women who have been disproportionately affected by this pandemic. With the surge in gender based violence, the increased responsibility of unpaid care work, and new obstacles that have reversed so much progress for women in the workplace, we’re at an inflection point for gender equity. Women, and especially women of color, have seen a generation of economic gain wiped out. Since the pandemic began, nearly 5.5 million women have lost work in the U.S., and 47 million more women around the world are expected to slip into extreme poverty. But if we work together to bring vaccines to every country and continent, insist that vaccines are equitably distributed and fairly priced, and ensure that governments around the world are donating their additional vaccines to countries in need, then we can begin to fully rebuild. Not only to restore us to where we were before, but to go further and rapidly advance the conditions, opportunities, and mobilities for women everywhere.

My husband and I are thrilled to soon be welcoming a daughter. It’s a feeling of joy we share with millions of other families around the world. When we think of her, we think of all the young women and girls around the globe who must be given the ability and support to lead us forward. Their future leadership depends on the decisions we make and the actions we take now to set them up, and set all of us up, for a successful, equitable, compassionate tomorrow. Now tonight we’ve had a reminder of things we miss the most, be it live music or sporting events, or just physical contact with family and friends where we can sit together, laugh together, and hug one another. Whatever it is, it all circles back to the same thing: Connecting as a community. For most of us that means our local community. Our loved ones, our neighborhood. But let’s also think about our global community. Across the world, we’ve struggled together. Now we deserve to heal together. We want to make sure that as we recover, we recover stronger. That as we rebuild, we rebuild together. Thank you.”


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