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Archewell Audio, the podcast arm of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s production firm, has tapped award-winning podcast producer Rebecca Sananes as head of audio

Prince Harry, Meghan Markle’s Archewell Hires Podcast Producer Rebecca Sananes as Head of Audio

Archewell Audio, the podcast arm of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s production firm, has tapped award-winning podcast producer Rebecca Sananes as head of audio.

Most recently, Sananes for the last two years has been lead producer for New York Magazine’s “Pivot” tech, media and business podcast hosted by Recode cofounder Kara Swisher and NYU professor Scott Galloway.

Archewell Audio, founded by the Duke and Duchess of Sussex last year, inked a multiyear pact with Spotify to produce exclusive original podcasts that “uplift and entertain” by highlighting diverse perspectives and voices. Archewell Audio has not announced specific podcasts in the works; its first project was a half-hour holiday special released at the end of 2020 produced with Spotify’s Gimlet.

At Archewell, Sananes reports to head of content Ben Browning, previously producer whose credits include Promising Young Woman,” “The Big Sick,” “Arrival” and “Room.” She will join the Archewell team in August to lead the company’s podcast partnership with Spotify.

“Pivot,” from New York Mag and Vox Media (which acquired New York Media two years ago), has won multiple awards including iHeartRadio Podcast Awards’ business and finance podcast (2021), the Webby Awards podcast of the year (2020) and Adweek’s Thought Leadership Podcast of the Year (2019).

Sananes has more than a decade of experience in podcasting and journalism. Prior to joining Vox Media in 2018 as an audio producer, she worked for Vermont Public Radio as a reporter and at Boston’s WBUR public radio station as a producer. She holds a bachelor’s degree in English and film studies from the University of Vermont and a master’s degree in broadcast journalism from Boston University.

Princess Diana #at60′ here is why princess Diana will always be remembered as the “People’s Princess.”

“No one can fill her shoes in terms of the work she did.”

Princess Diana captured the world’s attention as a royal trendsetter, but during her time in the public eye, she also became a prominent philanthropic force. Diana worked tirelessly on behalf of charities around the world, using her fame to raise awareness of a number of important humanitarian issues. Twenty years after her death, here’s why Diana will always be remembered as the “People’s Princess.”

1) She changed the face of the British monarchy.

Through her charity work, Diana highlighted how royalty, which had previously been known for its stuffiness, could be in touch with the public. In her interview with BBC’s Panorama in 1995, she said, “I would like a monarchy that has more contact with its people.” This statement became something of a personal mission for the Princess. Diana was at some point patron of over 100 charities. During her many visits to hospitals, schools and fundraising galas, she became known for spending hours talking to people and listening to their stories. Although she found the media’s intrusion into her personal life “intolerable,” Diana found a way to use this to bring attention to the people and the causes that needed it most.

2) She led a campaign for a worldwide ban on landmines.

After a visit to Angola in 1997, Diana became anti-landmine activists’ most prominent advocate. During that trip, which was captured by the BBC for a Heart of the Matter documentary, the Princess was photographed putting her own safety at risk as she walked through a recently cleared minefield. “I’d read the statistics that Angola has the highest percentage of amputees anywhere in the world,” she told the cameras. “That one person in every 333 had lost a limb, most of them through land mine explosions. But that hadn’t prepared me for reality.” Diana’s commitment to mine clearance work captured the public’s attention and decades after she started her campaign, the support for the cause continues. Her son Prince Harry, who is now patron of leading landmine charity, The HALO Trust, recently called for the world to become free of the weapons by 2025.

3) She changed the world’s perception of HIV and AIDS.

In April 1987, when speculation around the virus was rife, Diana was invited to open Britain’s first AIDS ward at Middlesex hospital. A photograph, which made front-page news around the world, showed her shaking hands with HIV-positive patients without wearing gloves. This publicly challenged the notion that HIV/AIDS was passed from person to person by touch and highlighted Diana’s affection and compassion for people living with the disease. In the following years, she went on to make several bedside visits to patients at a number of hospitals, including a hostel for abandoned children in Rio de Janeiro and a hospice in Toronto. At the time of her death, Gavin Hart, of the National AIDS Trust, told the BBC: “In our opinion, Diana was the foremost ambassador for AIDS awareness on the planet and no one can fill her shoes in terms of the work she did.

“No one can fill her shoes in terms of the work she did.”

4) She raised awareness of leprosy.

Like her AIDS efforts, Diana traveled to countries with a high leprosy rate in order to remove the stigma surrounding the disease. As patron of The Leprosy Mission, she visited hospitals in India, Nepal and Zimbabwe and by spending time with patients, she dispelled one of the myths surrounding the illness—that it can be passed on by touch. “It has always been my concern to touch people with leprosy, trying to show in a simple action that they are not reviled, nor are we repulsed,” she said of the disease.

“It has always been my concern to touch people with leprosy, trying to show in a simple action that they are not reviled, nor are we repulsed.”

5) She made regular personal visits to London’s homeless centers.

Despite relinquishing most of her charitable causes after her divorce from Prince Charles in 1996, Diana became patron of Centrepoint in 1992 and remained in the role until her death in 1997. Both William and Harry were taken by the Princess to see the help offered at the charity’s shelters and, at the age of 23, William followed in his mother’s footsteps when he became patron. Speaking at the time, he told The Telegraph: “My mother introduced that sort of area to me a long time ago. It was a real eye-opener and I am very glad she did. It has been something I have held close to me for a long time.”

6) She reached out to children.

Diana displayed a great affinity for young people and became a champion for some the most vulnerable. As patron of The Royal Marsden Hospital, known for treating childhood cancers, and Great Ormand Street Hospital for Children, she was often pictured comforting children and made a personal connection with many. Speaking about her work with the Royal Brompton Hospital, London, she said: “I make the trips at least three times a week, and spend up to four hours at a time with patients holding their hands and talking to them. Some of them will live and some will die, but they all need to be loved while they are here. I try to be there for them.”

“Some of them will live and some will die, but they all need to be loved while they are here. I try to be there for them.”

7) She was an avid supporter of the arts.

Diana loved dance and after her divorce, The English National Ballet was the only non-humanitarian charity she chose to dedicate her time to. She was often seen enjoying performances and was known to take her sons William and Harry along with her. Her support and presence at fundraising galas helped to raise thousands of pounds for the company.

8) She was a devoted mother.

Whether she was doing the school run or taking her sons on a day out to a theme park, Diana did her best to give her young sons a “normal” childhood. She was passionate about helping others, but royal commentators said motherhood was clearly the job she loved the most. She led by example and often took William and Harry along with her on hospital visits. Today, the Princes continue to support their mother’s legacy as patrons of some of the charities she so prominently supported.

Prince Harry told this year’s Diana Award recipients in a video address that he and Meghan Markle “fundamentally believe that our world is at the cusp of change, real change for the good of all”

Prince Harry Surprises Diana Award Honorees, Says Princess ‘Would Be So Proud of You All’
Prince Harry told this year’s Diana Award recipients in a video address that he and Meghan Markle “fundamentally believe that our world is at the cusp of change, real change for the good of all”

Harry made a surprise video address to a ceremony honoring the latest group of young people getting Diana Awards for their humanitarian work and community action.

“I’m truly honored to be celebrating your work, your commitment to change making and the vital role that you’ve taken on representing a new generation of humanitarianism,” Harry, 36, said in the address.

“Later this week, my brother and I are recognizing what would have been our mum’s 60th birthday,” Harry continued, “and she would be so proud of you all for living authentic life with purpose and with compassion for others.”

He said, “Our mum believed that young people have the power to change the world. She believed in your strength because she saw it day in and day out and in the faces of young people exactly like you, she witnessed a boundless enthusiasm and passion.”

He added of wife Meghan Markle: “Meg and I fundamentally believe that our world is at the cusp of change, real change for the good of all.”

Tessy Ojo, the chief executive of the Diana Award charity tells PEOPLE of Harry’s address, “It is such an honor to have the Duke of Sussex saying this wonderful message of congratulations to the young people. For him to say to the young people that his mother would be proud of them means so much. It is such an honor that he is proud of the young people and the work they do. And it is such a massive pat on the back for them and their families.

“Every time her sons talk about the pride they have in the work that is being done in her name, brings me so much joy,” says Ojo.

Harry – who arrived in the U.K. late last week in order to unveil a statue dedicated to his mother alongside brother Prince William on Thursday – was talking as he introduced 16-year-old Louisville, Kentucky, resident Jacqueline Teague, one of the 25 young people from the U.S. Teague was being rewarded for her work in helping people get vaccinated, and Harry spoke in his address about how those most adversely affected by COVID-19 were those on the margins of society.

Teague was inspired by her grandparents after they struggled to sign up for the COVID-19 vaccine to launch a campaign, called VaxconnectKY, to ensure everyone in need in Kentucky could easily register for a vaccination.

He is clearly passionate about the Diana Award, which is the only charity that carries his late mother’s name.

The statue is a “landmark moment. It is a bringing back home for her. It is so well-deserving, in her 60th year, to bring her back to the home that she lived in and to remember her,” Ojo adds.

“She was ahead of her time. She reminds us about what humanity is about – to be able to care for others without any personal gain. She really symbolizes that and I hope that this moment will help us focus on what truly matters in society.”

She continues, “The Diana Award is becoming more global. I am super honored to shine a spotlight on these young people – not just for the year we have had but also the year that we will celebrate what would have been Princess Diana’s 60th birthday. Young people have had such a tough time particularly over the last 18 months so to see young heroes rising up to the challenge is so amazing.”

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Ojo notes that all the young people being honored were not alive when the late Princess of Wales was setting her example of service, and yet: “Princess Diana set the tone that young people today still find incredibly relevant, it resonates with them. When I hear young people saying to us, ‘If I could be half the person she was, I want to make her proud or I am trying to follow that example,’ [that] says something about the incredible person and icon that she was.”

There are more international honorees this year than ever, a testament to the increasing reach of the charity that was set up in her name.

Teague was among 25 young people from across America included in around 300 award winners on Monday. Ranging from age 10 to 24, they are:

Jae-Hee Bae, 17, from Centerville High School, Dayton, Ohio; Hollis Belger, 16, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Larkspur, Calif; Keely Cat-Wells, 24, of C Talent, LA, Calif.; Ruby Chitsey, 13, Three Wishes for Ruby’s Residents, Harrison; Chloe Mei Espinosa, 14, Skip The Plastic Straw, Newport Beach, Calif.; Jordan Grabelle, 16, Love Letters for Literacy, Voorhees, NJ; Daisy Hampton, 12, Including You, NYC; Nika Hirsch, 10, This Life Rocks, Northfield, Mn; Jui Kankari, 16, Chicago, Mich.; Aviva Klein, 24, University Blood Initiatives, Chicago, Mich.; Siya Kulkarni, 17, Project Enable Mount Olive, NJ; Krystian Leonard, 24, Shining S.C.A.R.S, Morgantown, West Virginia; Peyton Money, 9, Octopuses for Preemies, Williamston, S. Carolina; Caleb Oh, 16, Kid Changemakers, Crofton, Maryland; Apoorva Panidapu, 16, Apoorva Art Gallery/Save the Children, San Jose, Calif.; Swara Patel, 18, The Period Society, NYC; Dana Parella, 10, Cookies4Cures, Boulder, Co.; Pranavi Reddi, 16, Kindness4All, Frisco, Texas; Victoria Ren, 16, Stem and Buds, Pittsburgh, PA; Emmabella Rudd, 19, Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, Tallahasse, Fl.; Sierra RyanWallick, 23, Autumnleaf fundraisers, Landenberg, Pa.; Jeeva Senthilnathan, 19, Privando, Denver, Co.; Neeha Shukla, 16, Innovation Corner, Harrisburg, Penn.; Ruby Tilghman, 16, Amy Maddox Consulting, Panama City, Fl.